Not In The History Books

A blog about history you will not find in a history textbook.

Everything found under "My Writings" is written by me.
soundsof71:

Elton John and 55,000 of his closest friends at Dodger Stadium, wearing a sequined Dodgers uniform designed by Bob Mackie, October 26, 1975. Photo by Terry O’Neill.

soundsof71:

Elton John and 55,000 of his closest friends at Dodger Stadium, wearing a sequined Dodgers uniform designed by Bob Mackie, October 26, 1975. Photo by Terry O’Neill.

the-female-soldier:

Milka Kufrin was a Yugoslav partisan who fought against German occupation during the Second World War.
The daughter of Croatian peasants, Milka attended school as a child and as a young woman studied agriculture at the University of Zagreb. During her time as a student she also became a member of the Communist Youth Organisation.
In 1941 Yugoslavia was invaded simultaneously by the Axis powers of Germany, Italy and Hungary, and in response the Partisan Resistance was formed. Kufrin, then in her early 20s, immediately volunteered to join the resistance but was refused. After continuous persistence she was accepted in October 1941 and assigned to a unit stationed in Kordun.
In 1942 Kufrin was given the task of sabotaging the Zagreb-Rijeka railway line. Every night for a period of eight months she approached the railway to plant explosives, no simple feat due to how heavily guarded the rail-line was. For her efforts she was proclaimed a national hero by the Yugoslavian government.

the-female-soldier:

Milka Kufrin was a Yugoslav partisan who fought against German occupation during the Second World War.

The daughter of Croatian peasants, Milka attended school as a child and as a young woman studied agriculture at the University of Zagreb. During her time as a student she also became a member of the Communist Youth Organisation.

In 1941 Yugoslavia was invaded simultaneously by the Axis powers of Germany, Italy and Hungary, and in response the Partisan Resistance was formed. Kufrin, then in her early 20s, immediately volunteered to join the resistance but was refused. After continuous persistence she was accepted in October 1941 and assigned to a unit stationed in Kordun.

In 1942 Kufrin was given the task of sabotaging the Zagreb-Rijeka railway line. Every night for a period of eight months she approached the railway to plant explosives, no simple feat due to how heavily guarded the rail-line was. For her efforts she was proclaimed a national hero by the Yugoslavian government.

marthajefferson:

The World’s Oldest Crown 
The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time. 
(source)

marthajefferson:

The World’s Oldest Crown

The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time.

(source)

natgeofound:

A quiet mosque in Palestine, 1926.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

A quiet mosque in Palestine, 1926.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic Creative

I know the moon landing is well covered in history texts, but 500-600 million people watched it live. The story and numbers behind that is amazing. 

todaysdocument:

The Apollo 11 Moon Landing was televised worldwide and watched by 500-600 million, becoming a major cultural touchstone of the 1960s. Crowds from across the globe were mesmerized by the event, as shown in this clips from the film “Moonwalk One,” recently digitized by our colleagues in the National Archives’ Media Preservation Lab.

Moonwalk One, ca. 1970

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, 1962 - 1981. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

via Media Matters » Stepping Stones to the Moon

calumet412:

Boarding gondolas at the Great Basin on a searing hot summer day, Columbian Exposition, 1893, Chicago.

calumet412:

Boarding gondolas at the Great Basin on a searing hot summer day, Columbian Exposition, 1893, Chicago.

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

This week’s theme is “What I did on my summer vacation.” We’re highlighting some of the amazing 50,000 postcards available through the DPLA. 

Today, we’re looking at the variety of restaurant options available to the hungry traveller. The postcards above represent food options from California to New York and many stops in between with offerings as diverse as Italian in Nebraska, fried chicken in Texas, gourmet eating in Cincinnati, clams in NYC, a smorgasbord in Stow, and Cantonese in White Plaines. 

Where will you eat on your summer vacation?

All these postcards come from the awesome collections at the Boston Public Library, which come to DPLA via Digital Commonwealth. You should really check out the whole set. You have time—you’re on vacation!

(via historybizarre)