Not In The History Books

A blog about history you will not find in a history textbook.

Everything found under "My Writings" is written by me.

thisbelongsinamuseum:

The architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed 1141 buildings, but only 532 were actually completed during his lifetime. Many have since been demolished with only 400 buildings still standing. But did you know he designed a cat house? In the early 1950s, Gerald Tonkens commissioned Wright’s office to design and build his family’s residence in Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Tonkens’ daughter, Nancy, had a cat named Felinus and she requested an appropriate residence for the family pet. So the office designed a modern cat house in Wright’s favorite color, Cherokee Red. This important piece of feline design, along with the original rendering shown above, has passed through the hands of various auction houses and antique dealers over the years until it was recently acquired by the Feline Historical Museum in Alliance, Ohio, which I bet you didn’t know even existed. The museum not only displays the Wright-designed cat house but a large collection of historical feline artifacts like an early 1900’s wooden cat carrier, a 19th century scrapbook of cat memorabilia and over 1,400 cat-related books as well as real, live cats like Maine Coons and Ragdolls.

(via velocityway)

cr0w-jane:

Der Erlkönig (The Erlking)
Postcard for Schubert’s Lied, c. 1914, possibly by German illustrator Ernst Kutzer (1880-1965)
source

cr0w-jane:

Der Erlkönig (The Erlking)

Postcard for Schubert’s Lied, c. 1914, possibly by German illustrator Ernst Kutzer (1880-1965)

source

unexplained-events:

Dudleytown

is a famous “ghost town" located in the woods of Connecticut. Founded in 1737 by Thomas Griffis, Dudleytown was never a town but a township, part of Cornwall. The forest there was thick, and the land hard and full of stones, so living there wasn’t favorable. It is currently supposed that there were high levels of lead in the water there, as well as Native American tribes around the area fighting to take back their rightful land. Lightning strikes, disease, disappearances and suicides followed residents of Dudleytown, and by 1899 it was abandoned. In the 1920s, a doctor moved with his wife to the quiet forest, charmed by the peace, but after returning home from an emergency procedure, he found his wife had gone mad. It was believed something from the forest attacked her, and she was moved to a mental hospital. The circumstances around Dudleytown and it’s penchant for distaster came to be called a "curse,” though most believe the town just didn’t survive time.  

Source for second (top right) picture.

The Disappearing City In Peru

historical-nonfiction:

The Chimu people once had a vast empire that stretched more than 1000 kilometres from southern Ecuador down the coast of Peru. It was built on the remnants fo the Moche culture. Their empire thrived thanks to complicated water works to bring water to the desert, and the abundant seafood off the…

(Source: timetravelturtle.com)